What’s Happened in the past year, Part II

A continuation of the last post –  more then and now pictures

Lighting

LED bulbs are the way to go on a boat. They are available in 24v DC, they don’t generate much heat, and they use very little current – important when your power comes from batteries. If you have been down the aisles at your hardware store lately, you will have noticed that LEDs are the wave of the future for home applications as well. Since marine fixtures have not quite caught up in terms of diversity and style, we bought some fairly inexpensive fixtures from Home Depot, removed the bulb socket and replaced them with sockets for 24 v LED bulbs

Modified fixture with 2 LED bulbs

Modified fixture with 2 LED bulbs

The glass in the fixtures is frosted, so the light is even. They put out around 30w per fixture. We also put LED bulbs into some of the old fixtures. For those we bought “snowcone” bulbs that are slightly brighter, and which screw into regular sockets. These bulbs come from China. We have heard that they don’t last as long as they should, but they are currently the best that we could find, and we are hoping that by the time they fail, there will be more better bulbs available.

Testing the LED fixtures. The one on the left is an old fixture with a snowcone bulb, and the rest are modified HD fixtures

Testing the LED fixtures. The one on the left is an old fixture with a snowcone bulb, and the rest are modified HD fixtures

We had a number of old fixtures which were either heavily tarnished or had been painted. Jeff Allen from Onshore Painting got into a polishing mode and the results are pretty cool.

Old navy fixture before

Old navy fixture before

Old fixtures after polishing

Old fixtures after polishing

Galley

One of Nancy’s first Destruction Tasks was to use a sawzall to open up the galley wall.

Galley wall before Nancy

Galley wall before Nancy

Galley wall being removed. Arrow points to the sawzall

Galley wall being removed. Arrow points to the sawzall

Once we opened up the galley, we realized we had a pretty nice space.  There was a large Viking stove (4 burners, griddle, grill and 2 ovens) already there. We added a new refrigerator, dishwasher, microwave and ice maker. The new floor is a red Marmoleum (linoleum) product, and the counter tops are a composite resin with broken beer bottles embedded in the material. The counter tops are manufactured in Bend, OR, so we were supporting more or less local breweries.

Galley before renovation

Galley before renovation

Galley after renovation. Microwave on left, stove center dishwasher on right. New Marmoleum floor

Galley after renovation. Microwave on left, stove center dishwasher on right. New Marmoleum floor

You can see that I artfully staged the above photograph through the clever placement of muffins that Nancy had just baked in the oven.

Other side of the galley. New refrigerator and large sink.

Other side of the galley. New refrigerator and large sink.

The back-splashes are all stainless steel to match the refrigerator and dishwasher. The sink and faucet are also new. There were several requirements for the refrigerator. I wanted in-door water, and it had to fit in the hatch in the roof, since that is the limiting factor for size. The refrigerator was lifted to the coach roof with the crane, and then slowly eased into the galley by 5 guys. Even though we had carefully measured the refrigerator before we bought it, we still had to remove the doors before it would fit in the hole.

Left: The refrigerator prepares to be lowered into the alley. RightZ: the doors are replaced after the refrigerator is in place

Left: The refrigerator prepares to be lowered into the alley.
Right: The doors are replaced after the refrigerator is in place

On the salon side, we built a counter that runs the length of the galley. The top is teak, and after 5 coats of varnish, we will need to issue sunglasses to guests. There are 4 steel posts that support the crane on the roof, so they had to stay, but they have been boxed in with teak. The final result is quite impressive

New counter during construction - seen from the galley side

New counter during construction – seen from the galley side

Finished counter seen from salon side

Finished counter seen from salon side

You can see from the last picture that I have cleverly staged the image to include a cell phone. Many of the electrical outlets in the boat include 2 USB ports, so that you can charge cell phones, IPads, etc without needing an adapter.

Laundry

We got a Bosch stackable washer and drier. Again, they had to be small enough to fit down the stairs. After having spent the last 6 months going to the Laundromat (something we swore we would never do again), we are very happy to have our own unit. You can see the washer/drier on the left in the picture. On the right is a shot of the laundry room floor. It is original fir, that had the linoleum removed, was sanded and then sealed. We thought it looked pretty cool,  so we going to treat all the original wood floors in the boat the same way. The old brass nail heads look especially good.

Left: Washer/Drier stack Right: View of Laundry floor after sealing

Left: Washer/Drier stack
Right: View of Laundry floor after sealing

Hatch

There is an old wooden hatch on the foredeck just aft of the anchor winch that opens into the most forward guest state room. When we bought the boat, the hatch was pretty beat up.

Foreward hatch before

Foreward hatch before

Our original plan was to cover it with canvas so it wouldn’t leak, and deal with it at some point in the future (Phase II).  One day we got to talking, and Ben said he thought they could repair some of the seams fairly easily. One thing led to another. Then Jeff got involved and polished the brass, and started varnishing, and before we knew it, we had about 300 hours in the hatch. It is beautiful.

Hatch Renovation Left: Ben with a sander Right: Jeff at the polishing wheel

Hatch Renovation
Left: Ben with a sander
Right: Jeff at the polishing wheel

Hatch hardware: before and after

Hatch hardware: before and after polishing

The hatch reborn

The hatch reborn

Exterior Painting

There is no question in our minds that the guys at Onshore Yacht Refinishing are true artists. Their work is stunning: there is no other word for it. They have also been extremely generous with advice and equipment to help us tackle the inside painting.

The outside paint is all Awl-Grip epoxy. Like all the boat painting, it consisted of sanding down the original material followed by multiple coats of sealer, multiple coats of primer, epoxy to fair the surface, more primer and finally several finish coats.

Rear cabin after sanding

Rear cabin after sanding

After the primer coats have been applied and the epoxy spread to bring everything to a final, faired, surface, they put carbon dust over the entire surface. The carbon is then sanded down to show the smallest differences in height of the primer.

Primed cabin with carbon over the surface

Primed cabin with carbon over the surface

After the surface has been prepared, the final topcoats are applied. The results look like this

Wheelhouse wall after final coats

Wheelhouse wall after final coats

In addition to the painting, they also varnished all the outside doors and the hand rails

Exhingterior door after varnis

Exhingterior door after varnis

The varnish consisted of around 5 coats of Bristol varnish, followed by 2 coats of Awl-brite 3 part varnish. It shines.

We have used a lot of sealer, primer and paint on this project

Selection of exterior paint products

Selection of exterior paint products

The basic exterior colors are white, gray and cranberry for the trim. At one point in the middle of the project, we ran out of Awl-grip Cranberry, and discovered that it was no longer produced. However, Awl-grip will custom blend a color for you. We did that, and now have our own personal color – Gyrfalcon, or as the painters like to call it “Gyrberry”.

Awl-Gryp Gryfalcon, aka Gyrberry

Awl-Gryp Gryfalcon, aka “Gyrberry”

While the painters have been working on the outside of the boat, we have been tackling the inside. We discovered that I like to sand and Nancy likes to epoxy and paint. Good division of labor, since there is plenty of both to go around. We have completed our stateroom and the salon, the master head and shower, the day shower and the guest head and shower, primed one of the guest staterooms and sealed another.

Salon ceiling before sealing

Salon ceiling before sealing

Nancy painting the salon ceiling

Nancy painting the salon ceiling

Those are some of the highlights of the project to date. We will spend the next few weeks getting settled and trying to figure out where to put all of the things that we currently have in storage. More later.

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6 Responses to What’s Happened in the past year, Part II

  1. Very Very – - – CoooooooooooooooL – - – - – Dorin Robinson (Cle Illahee)

  2. Tom Freeman says:

    Nothing short of stunning progress.

  3. Judy Abelman says:

    Wow. Nothing to add to that!

  4. dbostrom says:

    Lured hear from Three Sheets NW.

    A ton of loving work devoted to a deserving subject. Beautiful!

    Please say that what looks like metallized mylar expandable dryer vent hose is only temporary? That stuff is a famous cause for dryer lint fires, also very inefficient. There’s a slightly safer and smoother expanding type made of aluminum but if you can possibly route the vent with plain galvanized steel duct or the equivalent the statistics look –way– better all ’round.

  5. dbostrom says:

    Duh, “lured here,” that is. :-)

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